D Major Scale / B Minor Scale

wheat's picture

Abstract:
Neck charts for the D Major Scale (a.k.a. "Ionian mode") and the B Minor Scale (a.k.a. "Aeolian Mode").

Body:
Here's a fingering chart for the D major scale:

The D major scale has two sharps, F# and C#. You can use it to play over D major chords, including Dmaj7 chords. The D root note is shown in a darker shade of grey. The safest notes in the scale are the root (D), the third (F#) and the fifth (A), as these comprise the D major triad.
The D major scale is also known as the D Ionian mode. And, though the magic of modes, it contains several other scales, including its relative minor, the B minor scale:

The B minor scale is also known as the Bm Aeolian mode or the "natural minor" scale. You can use it to play over B minor chords, including Bm7 chords. The B root notes is shown in a darker shade of grey. The safest notes in the scale are the root (B), the third (D), and the fifth (F#), as these comprise the B minor triad.

Comments

BoH's picture

Good Info!

Hey Wheat,

Thanks for posting all of this. How are you doing these great graphics? Are you using some type of graphic design program?

Bo


Low B, or not low B? That is the question!

Bo


You don't love me, you just love my FINGERSTYLE!
Peavey T40; SX/Squier P-bass; Spector Legend 5
Roland Bass 30 Cube

wheat's picture

gfx

Bo,

I do them with Adobe Photoshop, then I export them through ImageReady to make them load faster. Photoshop is the graphic editor I know best, though I also do some work with Fireworks. I'll be doing these for all twelve keys. Then I'll focus in more on how to apply them, I think.

Wheat

bassplaying.com

Spiky1's picture

What's this scale?

What is this scale B,C#,D,E,F#,G#,A,?
With a G# istead of natural.
This is what I have practised as a B minor scale.
Woops.

Fat man, fat bass.

G#

I think you should be playing G; not a G#

wheat's picture

Dorian

Spiky1,

That would be B Dorian, also a minor scale, though not the "natural minor" scale. If you play jazz, Dorian is actually the preferred mode for use over minor 7th chords. So you're doing fine. The "natural minor" scale is also one of the modes: the Aeolian mode. It's just a different sort of minor scale.

Jazzers like Dorian rather than Aeolian since they play lots of II-V-I progressions and that b6 sounds a little rough over the II (minor 7) chord.

Wheat

bassplaying.com

BoH's picture

Harmonic/Melodic Minor?

Isn't that also referred to as one of the other minor scales? Harmonic or melodic, I can't remember.

BoH


Low B, or not low B? That is the question!

Bo


You don't love me, you just love my FINGERSTYLE!
Peavey T40; SX/Squier P-bass; Spector Legend 5
Roland Bass 30 Cube

wheat's picture

No, but you're close...

There are just too many "minor" scales out there. Here's the basic rundown of the common ones, with definitions based on how they differe from the major scale:

  • "natural" minor / "pure" minor / Aeolian mode: b3, b6, b7
  • Dorian mode: b3, b7
  • harmonic minor: b3, b6
  • jazz melodic minor: b3
  • melodic minor: b3 ascending; b3, b6, b7 descending

Note that the jazz melodic minor is the same as the ascending form of the melodic minor.
Note that the descending form of melodic minor is the same as the natural minor.

Marc Sabatella has an explanation of the melodic minor that might help.

bassplaying.com

BoH's picture

Eureka!

Once again, my friend you have cleared something up for me. I remember a friend mentioning to me MANY years ago that the melodic minor is played differently in regards to whether one is ascending or descending. Thank YOU!

Bo


Low B, or not low B? That is the question!

Bo


You don't love me, you just love my FINGERSTYLE!
Peavey T40; SX/Squier P-bass; Spector Legend 5
Roland Bass 30 Cube